Chalk Painted Mason Jars

My latest crating venture has been painting mason jars. I’ve seen them all over Etsy and Pinterest and they are SO darn cute. I especially love the “ombre” jar sets. There are so many possibilities with different colors, sizes, stencils, themes, etc. After much trial and error, I’ve figured out that the type of paint you use is key! Here’s how I tackled this project.

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First, I gathered up some jars. I did a very small batch because I wanted to get the process down before I go nuts painting every jar in sight. LOL. πŸ˜€ I had a few quilted jars and also picked up these sets of mini jars at the Dollar Tree. I love the tiny size of them and think they’ll make cute “trinket jars.”

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For the newer packaged jars, I just started painting. For the previously used jars, I wiped them down with rubbing alcohol to ensure any dirt or oils were removed. A clean jar allows the paint to adhere to the glass better.

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The most important tip for this project: do NOT use regular acrylic paint. Even though many tutorials say it will work, I had a really hard time with getting the regular acrylic to stick to the glass. The first coat would go on streaky and the second coat would peel off the first coat, even after ample drying times. The best paint to use is chalk paint. I got the Craft Smart brand that is a chalky type of acrylic, which seemed to work well. I think the straight up chalk paint will work even better!

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I did the first coat with a soft paint brush and let it dry for 24 hours.

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Some might stop at one coat and be fine with that look, but for me it was a bit too transparent. I found the second coat has to go on quickly. The more brush strokes, the more likely you are to peel off some of the first coat. Overall they came out pretty good.

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I let them dry for another 24 hours. I then used some coarse sand paper to rough them up a little and create a worn, distressed look.

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Once sanded and wiped off with a towel (to get off the paint dust) I sprayed them with a clear sealer. Any clear poly will do. I used a satin spray and really liked the results.

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Tied on a little twine bow and boom! Do you like them with or without the lids?

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I love the quilted jars. The raised diamond pattern is pretty cute. I can envision one of these on my counter filled with a little bouquet of flowers. πŸ™‚

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I experimented with using scraps of homespun fabric to accent the jars. I think I like the twine better.

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I think I shall make another big batch with more colors now that I have the process down. For now I’ll put these in my booth at the co-op and see if they move. I’m thinking I’ll price ’em at $2.50 for the small jars and $6.50-ish for the large jars. If you have any tips or tricks for this project, please leave a comment and share!!!

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While the mason jars were drying, I tinkered with another quick project. I found this wooden puzzle while I was perusing the thrift store, and you probably already know what I did with it!

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MAGNETS! I am obsessed with making magnets because they are easy and great sellers.

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I am always on the look out for cool wood puzzle pieces for just this reason. I love this theme!

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Happy crafting! πŸ˜€

Mason Jar Bird Feeder

If you’re anything like me, you have a Pinterest board full of craft projects that you want to try but never seem to get around to! One of them is this adorable mason jar bird feeder. Last weekend, I spotted this little metal chicken feeder base for only $4 at Tractor Supply. This is literally the easiest, quickest project ever. You need virtually no crafty skills to make this and it came out so cute! All you need is the chicken feeder (any country supply store) a mason jar (I had on hand) and some twine or wire to hang it up.

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The mason jar screws right into the feeder. I think any standard jar will fit. I happened to pick up these little galvanized metal stars at Target in the $1 bin recently, and they matched the feeder base perfectly. You could decorate it however you want ~ that is the beauty of simple projects like this.

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The only semi-challenge was devising a way to hang it up. I’m not about to start breaking out diamond drill bits and try to drill a hole in the glass. I have seen wire wrapped around the jar for hanging, which seems easy. I decided to use twine ($1 store or Walmart) to create the hanger.

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First, I braided 3 strands of twine to make it a little thicker and more durable. It’s hard to describe how I knotted it, so here’s a little graphic of how I created the twine hanger.

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I hung the little stars wind-chime style from the top of the hanger. I love that the metal stars match the metal feeder base.

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For a 5 minute, $5 project, I love it! What a great craft fair item to make a sell at Spring/Summer shows. You could jazz them all up and sell for at least $12-$15 each. I want to make some for my booth at The Carriage Place; I’ll let you know how they sell!

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Country Mason Jar Center Pieces

I had to share this fun little endeavor I’m working on! I’m honored to be helping a friend with the decor for her upcoming country-themed wedding this Fall. I have been chipping away at favors, and she recently asked me about doing some center pieces. With dark purple as her main color, she asked for something using “mason jars and burlap” and I immediately visualized these!

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So easy, not to mention economical!!! Strips of burlap (cut from a burlap bag), hot-glued onto the mason jar. Then on top, a purple ribbon (Michaels). Finished off with some raffia and/or jute twine. You can find mason jars at craft stores, thrift stores, Walmart, or even the Dollar Tree!

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She will put 3 gebera daisies in one and a candle in the other! It will look so pretty flickering against the burlap. πŸ™‚ I can think of a billion ways to personalize or customize these. The possibilities are endless.

  • Add a wooden tag or skeleton key
  • Glue on a faux daisy or flower on the front
  • Change up the ribbon color
  • Use homespun fabric or lace instead of burlap
  • Use different colored twine or raffia
  • Add stamped grungy hang tags
  • Add a metal wire around the neck and hang them up
  • So many ideas! Be creative!

One last thing! I wanted to announce that I have finally re-opened my Etsy store and have a made up a special coupon especially for my blog peeps! Upon check out, enter in the following code into the “apply coupon code” section, for 20% off your total order of $10 or more. Enter it exactly as shown; no spaces. πŸ™‚

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I have added a few new things like porcelain knobs, rolls of burlap, metal letter stamps, and more skeleton keys. I also have much more to add in the upcoming weeks, so stay tuned! Thanks and be back soon! πŸ™‚

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The Redneck Wine Glass

I have been wanting to do this project forever! It’s the one and only “Redneck Wine Glass”! I’ve seen them everywhere from Etsy to Bass Pro Shops to our very own Finger Lakes Wineries, and they sell anywhere from $10-$20 a piece! This leaves a lot of room for profit if you decide to make them yourself! I have always thought they’d be a great item to sell at my co-op considering we are kinda out in the country. πŸ™‚ I love how they came out and am so excited to share them with you!!!

Start out with mason jars and clear candle sticks. I got all of these at The Dollar Tree, but I am sure you could get them even cheaper if you did some thrifting!

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My glue of choice was E-6000, as many other tutorials had suggested. I have seen mixed feedback on using E-6000 for this particular project. Some people say that it does not hold. Others have never had a problem, even after multiple (hand) washings. My glasses seem quite sturdy and I could not pull them apart, even with great force. On the tags I made, I recommended hand washing to prevent breakage (many reports of them falling apart were only after they went through a dish washer!)

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The E-6000 dries crystal clear. Use a good amount of glue to ensure a good seal!

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I let mine sit like this, undisturbed for 4 days. Those who had problems with them falling apart mentioned they had only let them dry for 24 hours. I’d definitely recommend letting them dry for at least 48-36 hours or more before handling them!

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Next, for the tags, I used this brown kraft paper I got at the craft store. It’s a thin card stock and was perfect for these tags!

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I made up some a little blurb for the tags: “The Official Redneck Wine Glass ~ Hey y’all – You don’t have to be a hillbilly to enjoy this one of a kind glass, but you do have to have a sense of humor! Fill β€˜er up with your favorite wine, beer, or moonshine, kick up your heels, and GIT-R-DONE! Care instructions: Hand wash in warm soapy water & air dry.” This text is a combo of tags I found online with my own twist. πŸ™‚ Feel free to use this wording if you are thinking of making your own tags!

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I used Microsoft Powerpoint to lay out the text, saved the file as a PDF, and kept making test prints to get the size right. I kept shrinking the font size til the blurb fit perfectly into my tag hole-punch! This tag punch is a large one – 3.5″ tall by 2″ wide.

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To add some color, I traced the lids onto some scrapbook paper to make little lid covers. I used gingham and stars – but you could customize your glasses for any occasion by using different lid designs and themes! πŸ™‚

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And here they are! I tied a small strip of burlap on the stem of the glass (you could use raffia or torn homespun too) and then tied on my little tags with some twine.

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Woohoo! I looooove them! I only made 6 for now but am totally making more! I’ll let ya know if they do well at the co-op! Hope everyone has a Happy St. Patty’s Day!

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